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  • Kim Meninger

There Is Only One Me


There Is Only One Me - Juan Taveras


In this episode of the Impostor Syndrome Files, we talk about our natural tendency to compare ourselves to others, which often leads us to dismiss what we uniquely bring to the world. This week, I talk with Juan Taveras, an HR and DEI leader, about his journey in the DEI space, as well as his perspectives on the future of DEI. We also talk about the responsibility and opportunity each of us has to do our own DEI work. And, finally, we talk about how Juan has navigated impostor syndrome as a new entrepreneur.


About My Guest

Juan Taveras is a people-oriented Human Resources and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) professional with 17+ years of experience designing, orchestrating, and championing inclusive workplace initiatives that foster psychological safety, strengthen organizational alignment, and increase engagement. Juan began his career in the hospitality industry managing hotels and restaurants. Thirteen years ago, he transitioned into the nonprofit sector where he held HR leadership roles at various organizations. Last year, Juan and his wife co-founded DEI Pro Finder, a public online directory for DEI consultants. Juan’s unique blend of experiences and passion for the human resources profession make him an ideal partner for any leader looking to bring out the best in their team members.


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Transcript

Kim Meninger

Welcome Juan, it is such a pleasure to meet you. And I am so excited for our conversation today, I'd love to start by inviting you to introduce yourself.


Juan Taveras

Awesome. Thank you so much, Kim, and happy to be here. So yeah, I’m Juan Taveras I am a human resources and Diversity, Equity and Inclusion consultant. So I own a business now for the last year and a half, I've been in the entrepreneurship space. Our business is called DEI Profinder. And it's an online directory where I connect HR leaders looking for support with their DEI programming. And this idea sort of stemmed from my own challenges as an HR leader doing this work. And having wished that a resource like this existed, and I decided to just take the leap of faith and, and dive into doing this work. And I've been doing it now for a year and a half, and love it. But prior to that, prior to being an entrepreneur, I was in the workforce for over 17 years and 13 of those years, I was an HR leader, most of that time was spent in the nonprofit sector. So I was doing HR work specifically in education, the education space, in the nonprofit sector in New York City, I am now in Phoenix, Arizona, with my family. And here, I've had an opportunity to work with a variety of different organizations, but all within the HR leadership world. So I have a lot of experience taking care of people and creating workplaces that are inclusive and engaging. And that, you know, people want to return to every day. And you know, the last few years have sort of changed a lot of how we think about work, as you know, with a pandemic and a lot of companies going fully remote, etc. So it's been, it's been quite a, an interesting learning opportunity for us to think about our work differently, which I'm sure we'll get to in our conversation. But just to share a little bit more about my personal life. I am originally from New York City, I was, I was born in the Dominican Republic, My parents migrated to New York City in the mid to late 80s. And I spent most of my life in New York City. And after college bounced around a bit, I got a degree in Hospitality Management, which is a little bit random, but it was what I was attracted to at the time. And I really enjoyed all the travel that I got to do and, and learning about management from that perspective of hospitality and creating spaces where people feel welcome and, and happy. And then sort of transition to the nonprofit sector almost as a it wasn't intentional. It was a, an opportunity presented itself and I, I took it and then 13 years later have had an awesome career in the nonprofit sector.


Kim Meninger

Well, and you have girls, right? You have daughters?


Juan Taveras

Yes, we have my wife and I have three girls, seven year old, a four year old and an 18 month old. So it's a full house.


Kim Meninger

Oh my goodness, I have two boys. So you probably have very different energy.

Juan Taveras

Yes, that's so funny. My wife's best friend has three boys. And whenever they come over, we're like, gosh, we were not meant for boys. I think you're totally right. It was a completely different energy. And but it's always a blast. And I don't know.


Kim Meninger

Oh, I bet, that's, that's such a cute ages too. So you, I appreciate your sharing a little bit about your journey. And I'm curious because you mentioned being an HR and did you see DEI as sort of embedded into your HR role throughout? Or did you feel like there was a particular point when you shifted your focus to DEI more specifically?


Juan Taveras

Yeah, that's a great question. So I would say that for me. It wasn't the AI as we know it today. But it was a my leadership style and approach, as always, in involved like inclusion at its core. And I really tie that back to my hospitality training, right, which was so focused on ensuring that we were creating spaces where everyone felt welcomed, and that they would tell their friends about and want to come back to. So I bring that I brought that mindset into my work as an HR leader, and ensuring like that the onboarding process was incredibly welcoming. And that communication was clear and consistent and that everyone had what they needed to be successful. So for my own personal work, inclusion was a big aspect of it. But to answer your question about when I wasn't fully responsible for like a DEI initiative or a strategy until probably 2019 When, when the organization I was working, I decided to get more serious about that. And that, that required me to get more information and more education. And I got certified and I participated in, in to a couple of programs at Cornell and Georgetown University. But, but yeah, it wasn't it didn't become more official until later in my career. But I like to think that inclusion was something that I built into the way that I practice HR frequently.


Kim Meninger

Hmm. And, you know, I think a lot about this, because I never held an official DEI role. But the work I do is very intricately linked to di because I'm always thinking about how do we help people, particularly people who are members of underrepresented groups have felt marginalized in some way to feel more empowered to overcome some of the self-doubt that's kind of both intrinsic but also a function of the environments that we operate in. Right? And so one of the things that and you know, not to dive into a really hard question off the bat, just curious, curious what your thoughts are on the sort of controversy around DEI right now. And the fact that there's, it's, it's unfortunate that some, you know, work that is so well-intentioned and so important, is now becoming so politically charged. And I wonder how you think about the future of DEI?


Juan Taveras

Absolutely. And I appreciate that question. Because in my work, it's, I connect with leaders that are facing that challenge every day. And here's the thing, I think, like I said, DEI has gotten a lot more attention over the last few years, but it's been around for decades, right? So it's, we just call it something different depending on the, on the stage of or, you know, what's going on in society. But it started with the Civil Rights Act, and, and ADA and women's rights and like all of the over the, over the years, as it has continues to evolve. And I know, one of my personal mentors, has been in the DIY space for 30 years, this is sort of his career and, and I learned so much from him about, like, the challenges that we're facing today. He's like, Oh, yeah, I've seen this, we've, you know, we've been through some version of this in the past, with politics and all the other stuff that goes on. But at the end of the day, and this is why I am so passionate about the work that, that my team and I do at DEI Profinder it's really about connecting this work back to our humanity, right, it's, it's about to your point, like, like these, there are groups of people and specifically based by an identity in the workplace that are marginalized, that are feeling excluded. And that's across the board. I'm not, I'm not calling here, right, because this is, and this is where the conversation gets really interesting when we start to focus on those experiences, and, and in creating opportunities for everyone to be engaged in that conversation and not have to show up authentically as themselves and not about spending too much time on either extreme of the conversation. And that's where I see a lot of the challenges coming from when, when organizations are leaning too far, one or one way or the other, as opposed to really sitting in the gray as uncomfortable as it can be. To embrace all of the different perspectives and identities and, and ensure that everyone feels like they can contribute and has a voice. And again, this is easy, right saying it. And I'm no longer like an HR leader trying to do this in the workplace. So I know firsthand how hard it can be. But I also know that there are organizations and consultants doing this really well. And I tried to highlight that as much as possible that there is a to your point, like my perspective, my outlook, for DEI into the future, I'm optimistic. I think they're, we're in a place where the vast majority of organizations are pausing this work and you know, budget constraints and all the other things that are happening due to the economy, but a lot of them are simply taking a pause and reassessing where they are, and thinking about new and better ways to approach this work moving forward. But what we hear about in the news is the extremes, right, the folks that are completely cutting di out of their budget or laying off all of those roles and departments, which is unfortunate, but it's also not what's happening everywhere.


Kim Meninger

I really appreciate that viewpoint and it gives me some hope too. And I also really love your tie back to hospitality because I think that's such an interesting connection there of your vision of inclusion. And can you say more about the relationship there and like what, what inclusion looks like?


Juan Taveras

Absolutely. Yeah. So thank you for that call. Because this is my hospitality background is I'm, I joke that it sounds random, that I do, I do the work that I do. But in so many ways, it's the foundation, it set the foundation for me in the way that I think about HR work and people-centric work, right? So being customer-focused, in any business leader will tell you this, right, like how important it is to stay connected to your customer and what it is that they want and need it because without them, your business doesn't exist. Well, the customer for HR leaders is the people right inside an organization. So staying really connected and rooted in what it is that they, that they want a need. And be mindful of the of the business constraints that you can do that within it, because this is also a place that I see HR leaders sort of getting into trouble, if you will, or will face more challenges, when they try to, in order to appease or please a group of people, they, they, they try to shift the business focus, which then it brings up more challenges, it's like, well, at the end of the day, we have this business exists for a reason, it's got a why right, and it's got a mission and a purpose. And ideally, you have core values that are aligned with all of that work that you do. So, so making sure that that your everything that you're doing is within those within sort of that container, which in my experience actually creates, like safety, right when you know, like, these are the things that we can discuss, right? Like we can have conversations about or we can have discussion about. But here, this is, this is a non-negotiable, this other thing out here we can't discuss because it's not aligned with, with the work that we're doing. And, and from, and I did this as an HR leader, myself, and I remember having really interesting conversations about folks saying, oh, that's, that's incredible, I appreciate that level of clarity, like now I know, like if I am if I have a problem with this thing, then but it is, but it is a non-negotiable for the business, then I have to I have a choice to make, I can either know that and continue to work here or, or choose something else, right. But, but when it's not clear, when it's when, when DEI is treated, like it's about each individual getting what they, what they want, or, or expressing every concern, then it becomes this kind of wishy-washy, I don't know, strategy is going to make everyone happy, etc. So it causes a lot of cultural challenges that are hard to overcome. And that's what we're seeing sort of play out and in society right now.


Kim Meninger

I think that's such a great point. Because if it's just a free-for-all right, and everybody, because, you know, I think about that a lot to what, what does it mean to be your authentic self? In the world? Some people are authentic jerks, right? The kind of behavior that we are encouraging. Right, right, exactly. I was trying to think about not your authentic self, necessarily, but your best self or your, your best professional self. Because, yeah, I mean, there, there has to be a certain, certain parameters set by the business for what is appropriate or what, what's to be expected in a workplace.


Juan Taveras

100%. I love I love that example, too. Because you're you have to remember that you are now a member of a broader community, right? So it's not, it's not just about you, it's about how you're showing up to in support of the folks that you're working with. And in supporting the business. And to tie this back to the hospitality world. I think, as you were saying, as you were saying what you were saying, it reminded me of a lesson that I learned from one of my leaders in a hotel that this idea that the customer's always right, this individual, like, hated that. That's that phrase because there's like they're not always right. You know, like, there are times where you have to say, you know, what, we are not able to meet your needs. So we will, you will need to go elsewhere to find what you're looking for. Because when you focus too much on that one individual, then it's at the expense of others write that most of the time, right and I'll give you like a very simple example. There's like, no smoking in hotel rooms. But and now we have some hotel rooms that have like smoking rooms and non-smoking rooms. But this one particular one that I worked at, did prefer to not have any smoking, they had smoking areas outside of the hotel. But one individual customer was adamant that they wanted to smoke in the room. And our leader just didn't allow it. So he said that that's, that's not going to happen and no matter how much money your additional money you're willing to pay is it's just not part of our of our it does not align with the way that we do business. So eventually that individual had to go elsewhere right to, to get what they wanted. So it isn't about meeting everyone's needs are trying to make everyone happy. It's about being clear about what it is that we're trying to achieve. And whether it's that's aligned with you or not. Right.


Kim Meninger

So yeah, yeah. And it can see a connection to values too, right? Because if you, if you go by that, I think, false belief that the customer's always right, then you have to compromise your own values in order to please the customer, right? And similarly, with employees, you have to stand for something. You want to stand for something, make that clear, and then people can self-select, do I want to be part of this culture or not?


Juan Taveras

Right. And that doesn't, that doesn't mean that that culture is not inclusive. Right? It's because it's, it's about it, that is a we can look at this so microscopically. Right? It's that this, this one instance, it's about the whole picture and the rest of the people involved in this community, and balancing all of the needs with the needs of the of the business at the core, right?


Kim Meninger

Yeah, and, you know, I really appreciated what you said too, about being part of a community. And I think that, at least in my experience, and I worked in high tech for roughly half of my career. And so, you know, I had a lot of first-hand experience, I didn't work in HR, but I worked in the business. And I know a lot about what it feels like to be included and not. And I think that one of the challenges is that many of us believe in inclusion and want to see it and we have very high expectations of what our senior leadership team will do or what the HR team will do. But I wonder if we could talk for a moment about individual responsibility, because I think about this, even at a very, very micro level, that the same person and this was me, I know, I've certainly done this myself to have the same person who wants more inclusion in an organization might also be exclusive in the way that they interact with their colleagues and maybe saying things like, Well, I just don't really like this guy, I'm not going to spend, you know, I don't like working with this person. So I'm not going to spend a lot of time getting to know him or be more curious about him. And so when you think about doing DEI work, which happens at a macro level a lot of the time, like, how can we get to the individual person who's not the CEO, not necessarily, you know, influencing everything, but it's more, it's more of like, how do we create a culture where everybody feels a sense of ownership of this experience?


Juan Taveras

Yeah, that's a great question. And, and I, I agree that that's, that's the work, you have to do as a macro level work, in order to get to that to that space, where everyone has seen their end there the role that they play as individuals and maintaining a culture of inclusion and an equity and embracing diversity. So one of the things and this is actually my part of my own journey in this work. So I mentioned that I didn't start doing DEI work or being responsible for it until 2019, like more holistically in my work. And when that happened, I recognized and this is why I'm so excited. I'm on your podcast because impostor syndrome is something that, you know, we all struggle with at some point. But when I was given this new set of responsibilities, I was like, oh boy, like I don't I don't know how to do this I have I have a sense but to be responsible for this organization strategy was a big, it felt like a big weight on my shoulder. So I knew I needed help. And in that I needed to sort of educate myself on best practices out there. So, I went I participated in some certification programs. But to your point, that was, that was high level, here's how you sort of systematize the AI operationalize the AI and from an HR perspective, but I was still struggling with this like okay, but even me as an HR leader, I have questions about what I'm learning and, and, what, what the end goal is of this work so I ended up getting one on one coaching from, from a DEI consultant who is now a very good friend of mine. And through that work, she, she helped me explore my own biases because that was really the block for me that it was a my there were there were there were certain personal values and personal identities that were in what I thought I thought they were in conflict with the DEI work but in reality, it was just a lack of openness on my hands. So I had to spend time with that and really sitting with my belief and in exploring what they were rooted in, and what it meant for me to do something that is different than that in the workplace. And that's where I started to sort of gain confidence in, in my perspective, but also my ability to separate my personal identity from my professional identity and like what I was expected to do in the workplace with, I own me personally, right, because it's not about me, it's about making sure that this, this community of people can, can work better together and, and embrace these, these ideals. So, to answer your question, I think a lot of the work again, once, once you, once you get past the, the macro level stuff, which requires a lot of leadership buy-in, and you're, you know, developing systems and processes that are rooted in diversity, equity and inclusion, you, you have an opportunity to continue to essentially go deeper. And that's where you get to that individual level. And that's where you start to explore your own identities. And, and I think we don't, you know, this doesn't happen in the workplace, often you don't get an opportunity to learn about who you are, and why you show up the way that you do. And they are, you know, I think about this, if you if you, if you think about a curriculum, like a way to scaffold this work, is, uh, you know, we can explore identities, once we're ready to go there and things like our own our privilege as well and, and our biases. But let's start even more simpler than that. And things that make that we can, we can leverage in the workplace almost immediately think assessments like the MBTI, and disc and strengths finders, right? Those are ways that we are all expressing ourselves and our uniqueness. But in, in, we're using frameworks that are already, already exist, and that we're all familiar with, to help us work better together. So I think that when we start doing that work, and we start to recognize that, oh, I, what I was describing before, like to use your example, that I don't like this individual role. So I'm not I don't want to and I've been there, I don't want to spend too much time with them. What I really what I now recognize is that they just have a different communication style than I do. So I have to approach them differently or share information with a differently they don't answer my emails, because my emails are too long. Or they don't have enough detail, or I'm not, you know, whatever it is. So you start to have, you start to build your awareness around the difference between people and yourself and others. And to your point, start to build curiosity around like, Oh, here's a here's a pain that I'm feeling like let's, let's unpack that and get, get into better understand what's, what's really going on here. Because at the end of the day, we're all we're social creatures, right? Like, as human beings, we want to be we want to belong, we want to feel connected to the people that we are around. So whenever there are those feelings of or let's call them negative feelings, for lack of a better word, but there's, there's something there that can be unpacked, and that we can learn from.


Kim Meninger

I love what you're saying because the reason I ask the question, I'm so grateful to you for sort of indulging me in in this conversation, which is really hard because it's hard to get your arms around everything that we're talking about. I'm really glad you brought back impostor syndrome to because I think one of the things I think about when I think about DEI is it often feels so abstract for the average person, right? And so we know, we know it when we see it, or we know it when we don't see it, right? It's kind of this thing that you but you don't necessarily know, on a daily basis, what are the expectations of the average person who doesn't have, you know, hold lots of power. And I think about it from a self-empowerment perspective, because we talked about something like imposter syndrome, where I feel this sense of self-doubt, and I'm questioning myself, you know, a lot of that is rooted in a feeling of I don't feel safe here. I don't feel connected here. And some of that may truly be the responsibility of the organization, the people around us, maybe it's not a an inclusive culture, but maybe there are things that we can personally do to change our own experience by better recognizing like you're talking about what are my own individual biases? How am I interpreting this situation? Are there other things I can do to better connect with my team or with people around me so that I have a different experience? So I always try to look at it. You know, certainly the big picture is really important, but also like the, what's the what's the individual opportunity that each of us has to try to, try to you know, try to I feel I'm choosing my words carefully here because it is so complicated. But yeah, just kind of drive a greater sense of inclusion in our own little microcosm.


Juan Taveras

Absolutely. Yeah. I love that you that you said that because it is ultimately, everyone's responsibility. And I'm glad, I'm glad you mentioned safety because this is a, especially over the last year, this has come up a lot in my work. And I've, I've had an opportunity to work with my wife, actually, which has been exciting. She's a clinical psychologist and has a private practice here in our hometown. So when one of my clients what came to us and this, this, this individual organization had already done a lot of work in the DEI space, and they're, they have ERGs, and you know, there are employee resource groups. So they're pretty ahead of, of, I don't know what to call it, they're the norm or the or, or where most folks are, they're the very proactive about building DEI into their culture. And yet, they were struggling with, with leaders not being able to engage their team members and folks complaining about the leaders, leadership style, and feeling, not feeling safe to use your word about speaking up or sharing or being the full, authentic selves. So we got an opportunity to engage with this organization and do some focus groups. And what we learned was this idea of safety, it was a big and psychological safety, to be more specific, and which has become a bit of a buzzword over the last few years, but there's some amazing books out there about this topic, and how important it is, a lot of the books that are out there have use the importance of psychological safety to create innovation and to create like, you know, thriving workplaces, but you can also it also applies to the DEI work because when we're when we're talking about being able to express our identities, right and in contribution to an organization's mission, we need to feel safe, we need to be we need to know that I'm not going to be ridiculed or judged, or that my leader isn't going to think differently of me because of biases that I may or may not be aware of. Right? So creating those spaces where you are expected to, to be authentic and to question decisions or, or the way things are done in a productive way. So it's not so we're so we're having conversations and debates, right? Like there's, there's a difference between, we're gonna, we're there's a winner and a loser here versus, hey, I'm a member of this community, and I care about the work that we're doing, and I think we can do it better, is there an opportunity for us to have a conversation, right, and in as leaders creating, creating opportunities for, for that to happen, so, but I'm sorry, so full circle, there's also an individual components of that to, like, have responsibility for us to own our role in that and which requires a little bit of stepping into some fear and having courage to either manage up or down or sideways. And, and, and find opportunities, like you said, I love that word, find opportunities for you to engage with, with your community in, in different ways.


Kim Meninger

Yeah, because when I think about, you know, my own sort of journey with impostor syndrome, and anxiety and all of the negative feelings, I think about how it's, it's so much worse, when you feel isolated, it's so much worse when you feel like you can't ask for help, or when you can't access the support of the people around you. And so, you know, when you talk about to the imposter syndrome that comes with being given a new assignment, or being getting, you know, being challenged to take on responsibility that I've never done before, to just be able to feel like I have people I can talk to that safety piece is so important. And I think some of that is internally driven by our own willingness to do the scary thing by you know, and some of that is the responsibility of the organization to create a culture where that is safe to do.


Juan Taveras

Right. And where leaders are, are leading by example, in that way, demonstrating that this is expected and we're doing it also and this is what it looks like, and being vulnerable and, you know, things simple things like saying I don't know when, when you don't know something you don't leaders don't always have to have the answers are sharing more of their personal stories, right? And anyway, so that's a whole…


Kim Meninger

Yeah, you're absolutely right. And just to kind of stick with the imposter syndrome for a moment, didn't say there anything else that you learned from your own experience that you would share with others? I know you mentioned kind of doing some learning and, and getting access to trainings to, to learn to fill in some of those gaps, but anything else that you would recommend to people?


Juan Taveras

Sure, thanks. So, so some of the and I feel like this is it's a journey, right? So I'm still learning a lot about myself and sort of how I relate to the work and, and others doing similar work. So I would say that, that increasing your knowledge, helps you increase your confidence, right? So for me, it was like, Okay, there's this new thing, I know, some, but not enough to, like speak confidently about it. So I'm just going to gain more and more knowledge and skill around this. For in my personal journey, I also needed and thankfully, I was able to get a, an, an individual coach, to your point I have, have a safe space with someone that I can just be really honest with about my challenges. And, and what, what I was having a hard time sort of getting over. So that, that was incredibly helpful. But even still, even to this day, like there are times where I soaked, actually, let me just make this thought more succinct. So it's about remembering for me is it is a daily reminder that I am doing this work in the way that I am doing this work, right? So there's, there's no other Juan Taveras, doing this, this, there's only one me. And even though there's many other folks in this space, none bring to it my lived experience, my mindset, my personality, etc. So, I am getting more and more comfortable with essentially bringing more of me into the work that I do, as opposed to trying to imitate other people, or, or be someone else, which was which being someone that I'm not. And that's where a lot of those insecurity and the lack of confidence in the anxiety comes from when we're trying to be something that we're not. And, and it's, it's taken some time. Because, you know, we're told to like, emulate success and to look up to leaders. And that's all very important. And I have many leaders and mentors that I look up to. And every time what I'm practicing now is taking what, what I learned from them, and then spinning, like turning it into my version of that, right? And it feels authentic, and it's more aligned with who I am and my values. And that's where it feels less imposter-y. And more and more me. Yeah.


Kim Meninger

I love that. And I think that that's so important for so many reasons because I love that you just said there's only one me, right? And if we're trying to be a carbon copy of somebody else, we're always going to feel like we're not measuring that because we aren't that other person. Right? And we're never gonna get, we're never gonna get to a point where we feel like we're doing it, right? But it's also a lot more for, you know, if we set aside all of the other stuff, right, so it's a lot more interesting to do it your way than it is to copy other people's way of doing things. Absolutely. It allows for a lot more creativity and, and just it's just, you know, being a conformist is just not so much fun.


Juan Taveras

I agree. Yeah. Another thought I had on that note about luck, because, because even the creative process, especially for me as a new entrepreneur, like this has been a big learning curve. Because it looks different for everyone. But one thing speaking of impostor syndrome, something that I found myself doing, and I won't lie, I still do it sometimes today. But it's comparing myself so some there are times where I tried to copy right or emulate someone, which doesn't feel authentic. But there are also times where I try to compare myself to someone else when it's like, oh, they look more successful or Gosh, how do they come up with so much content and you know, all these, all these things, and it makes me feel like I'm not good enough or I'm not working fast enough or hard enough. And this is you know, the more I read about this, the more, more I realize it's just part of being human and, but, but, but for my lesson is to embrace your own creative process and whatever, whatever that looks like and as much as possible practice not comparing yourself to other people because you might be comparing and this is something I read in the newsletter the other day, which really stuck with me is like, I'm likely comparing my step one to their step 10. Right, so like, yeah, so, but they're just they've just been doing this longer. And that is why they're able to create as much content as they, as they have. And I will get there eventually. Or not. And it's and that's okay. Like, it's just, it's just about embracing my own journey and adding value to the people that I'm meant to serve as much as possible, and less about keeping up with the Joneses in the professional sense.


Kim Meninger

Yeah, exactly. And there's things that you have that they don't and we never think about it from that. I mean, unless we're being really judgy. You know, and they're like, I think you bring up a really unique perspective, having the hospitality background that you have, right like that's a, that's a perspective, that's probably missing from a lot of conversations. And when you're comparing yourself to other people, you're not thinking about it from that lens, you think about what you don't have, not what you do have.


Juan Taveras

Exactly, yes.


Kim Meninger

This has been such a fantastic conversation, Juan. And I know that you do this work for a living. So where can people find you if they want to learn more about you and your work?


Juan Taveras

Awesome. Yes, so I am pretty active on LinkedIn. That's probably where the only social platform I am currently on. So flying to Paris, and I have an MBA SPHR at the end of my name, just to differentiate myself from the other ones out there. But you can also check out our website, it's www.deiprofinder.com. If I don't know how many of your listeners are HR leaders, if they're looking for support with the DEI strategies, or a, a DEI consultants that would like to join the directory, and then my email address also throw that in here is one j-u-a-n at deiprofinder.com. And yeah, open to connecting with anyone to talk about impostor syndrome or di are vegan HR leader, whatever is on their mind.


Kim Meninger

Perfect and I'll put those links in the show notes as well. Thank you so much fun. This has been such a great conversation and congratulations on the business.


Juan Taveras

Thank you so much, Kim, happy to be here.


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